Thursday, September 8, 2022

Robert Telles Arrested

  • Robert Telles arrested for the murder of Jeff German. Press conference with more details at 10. [RJ
  • Who is Robert Telles (beyond a public administrator and Boyd '14 grad)? [RJ]
  • Henry Ruggs' preliminary hearing delayed once again. [RJ]
  • Shelter's reliance on rescues leaves dogs kenneled for months, even years. [Nevada Current]
  • ACLU sues over 21-and-over age restriction on Fremont Street. [News3LV]

101 comments:

  1. its times like these were we should truly be called the "Wild West" Law Blog ...cause shit be getting wild y'all

    ReplyDelete
  2. Legitimate Question: Over the past 2-1/2 years, did the Nevada ACLU challenge any COVID imposition of police power?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the ACLU endorsed all the police powers used to impose restrictions on the basis of Covid.

      Delete
    2. ACLU buy a clue. Way more important things to do than Fremont Street

      Delete
    3. No, because, despite its name, the ACLU really does not care about civil liberties.

      Delete
    4. 10:59, they only care about some civil liberties, but one must be of the correct political persuasion and support the correct cause.

      Delete
    5. Meet Bob Langford and you will see what the ACLU is all about. Joke

      Delete
    6. ACLU did some good in the 60's and early 70's. Now it has to find (or manufacture) odd ball, and some times silly, issues to justify its continued existence.
      In 2020 the executive director received a salary of $959,1919 for 26 hours of work per week, plus another 14 hours in a "related organization"
      Similarly, the Deputy Exec. Dir. received $494.291 and General Counsel received $432,522. Send your contributions to the Red Cross or Catholic Charities. ACLU doesn't need your money.

      Delete
    7. Could the writer who commented on 9-8 at 12:12 p.m. provide more specificity regarding sources regarding the alleged salary of the executive director? I find it very hard to believe that the executive director of the local ACLU received "$959,1919" [whatever that means] for compensation in one calendar year. Can you tell what the basis is for that statement, and what the precise salary paid actually happens to be. Thank you.

      Delete
  3. So this press conference is not very informative. Key points are that they identified Telles as person of interest early. They got confirmation of his car leaving his house at 9 on Saturday and returning at 12:30. They recovered shoes and straw hat that had blood and had been cut up in an attempt to destroy evidence. They saiid that they interviewed him yesterday and he opted not to have an attorney and then they let him go. They gave a bs answer about why, but didn't really address the fact that they let him go and then incurred all the expense of swat team, etc to arrest him. Based on what evidence they have shared, it seems very unlikely that he was framed or anything.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I watched it too and must say 10:29 - great summary!

      Delete
    2. They made it clear that Telles' DNA was found at the crime scene.

      Delete
    3. What I found interesting is looking into the mind of Telles. Knowing that he would be suspect number 1 and his unique vehicle was seen, that he left DNA, etc, etc - he still tried to destroy evidence by cutting up the hat, etc. as though he had a chance to escape. Dude has some really bad thinking going on. Also, it was clearly premeditated with the disguise, etc.

      Delete
    4. I'm amazed how so many seemingly level-headed competent people can snap at any given moment and forever ruin the rest of their lives. In this case, all over some bad press?? RIP German.

      Delete
    5. Yes 10:53, I will state the obvious, he somehow thought it would be better to destroy his family, his life, his career, Mr. German's life and family, etc. and to rot in a jail cell - than just take some bad press. Mind-boggling for sure.

      Delete
    6. Is the death penalty on the table? I'm interested if it can be used as leverage to try to get Telles to plead out. It sounds like they have him dead to rights.

      Delete
    7. I haven't seen anything that would qualify this murder for the death penalty. None of the statutory aggravating factors seem to be present.

      Delete
    8. Even if it was, and ordered, it's unlikely he'll ever see any death sentence carrier out. We all know the process takes decades. But by the time all that is exhausted, the death penalty in NV (and perhaps nationwide) will be abolished (rightfully so, in my humble opinion).

      Delete
    9. I don't understand why confront the intruder. I would have stayed inside and called the cops. It is not Halloween to where you want to go confront Hocus pocus. Rip, Mr.German

      Delete
    10. I don't want to start a firestorm of argument but IMHO this is yet another example of why to have a firearm for protection.

      Delete
    11. Probably wouldn't have helped stored in his closet when he gets ambushed in his front yard.

      Delete
    12. Why cut up the evidence? At a minimum burn it. For a well educated man, he did some dumb things besides the blatantly obvious.

      Delete
    13. Cutting it up is fine. However you have to make the cut up pieces disappear. Fire in the middle of a 115 degree day might have looked funny. However there is a lot of empty desert out there.

      Delete
    14. @11:40 What if German didn't confront an "intruder"? But instead, what if Rob gets to the door, takes off the disguise, rings the doorbell and says, "Hey Jeff, could we sit down and clear the air?" Jeff knows him personally and doesn't think anything of it and lets him in. I think that's much more plausible than Rob just ambushing him.

      Delete
    15. Had a robbery case once where the deft's cut up their shoes. They then hid those pieces under some clothes in an apartment. Police found the pieces, re-assembled them and that was key evidence leading to the conviction. In short, cutting stuff up is a waste of time.

      Delete
    16. Criminals should take up blacksmithing as a hobby and keep a forge and bellows in the backyard. Burn everything to ashes.

      Delete
  4. Queen Elizabeth dies. Jeff German ambushed and murdered. I believe the world maybe coming to the end

    ReplyDelete
  5. Would major case protocol have been implemented if Lombardo wasn't running for governor?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Highly probable. German is well known around Vegas and Nevada. Well-respected. I don't think Metro would want the backlash that would come with anything short of full-stop, irrespective of Lombardo's candidacy.

      Delete
    2. Protecting a free press is an obvious goal in our society, lest we devolve into a banana republic. Murder of a prominent investigative journalist would warrant it.

      Delete
  6. Not legal but certainly world news. "The Queen is Dead."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Long Live The King.

      Delete
    2. I always liked the Queen.

      Delete
    3. I find royal fawning embarrassing. I also find it shameful that Britains allow these inbred dolts to retain some very real powers. https://hipporeads.com/five-surprising-powers-british-monarchs-still-retain/. I will admit that some of my vitriol against the royals, in part, is an attempt to distract from America's idiocy - we chose our buffoons and they had more than five surprising powers.

      Delete
    4. We mean it, MAN!

      Delete
    5. You can respect the Queen for her accomplishments and as a decent figurehead without "fawning."

      Delete
    6. Not really. Fawning is required to call whatever she did (minimal) an accomplishment. And fawning is also required to look past why she was in the position to accomplish it in the first place.

      Delete
    7. Still a member of the Greatest Generation. Commissioned officer in the Auxiliary Territorial Service, the women's branch of the British Army. Commissioned as a second subaltern, later promoted to Junior Commander. Trained as an auto mechanic during WWII.

      We've lionized American WWII vets for less.

      Delete
  7. So Rob Telles was the same year as Brad Bellisario? To fall from the unmatched heights of Boyd '13 to the tragic depths of Boyd '14... it's emotional whiplash.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Boyd 2011 in the house. What a legacy? State Bar?

      Delete
    2. Boyd '14 = Jan Brady syndrome

      Delete
  8. Oh my - what a class. I wonder if there are any common causal factors e.g., bad water, polluted building, liberal teachings, personal pronoun usage policies, etc. We need John Travolta to make a movie where he sues Boyd and goes broke but the government takes them down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great book. Terrible movie.

      Delete
    2. Put a little Scientology twist on it and you can John Travolta AND Tom Cruise in the same movie, and maybe even those weirdos will fund the movie as well.

      Delete
    3. OP back, 2:33 JT was great in Civil Action but really, really, really bad in that science fiction one (no time to Google it), wow that was a bad movie, also liked him in Grease though but thought Olivia stole the show!

      Delete
    4. Pulp Fiction and Face Off.

      Delete
    5. You know, I work on my hair a long time and he hit it. He hits my hair.

      Delete
  9. It seems like such a bizarre over-reaction to some journalistic investigative pieces, which seldom turn out well for the politicians and can often be real hatchet jobs(and which politicians expect to encounter as an occupational hazard), but everyone has their breaking point, and perhaps he has a much lower one than many others due to a fragile psyche, etc.

    He may have perceived his career and reputation going down the drain, and it's conceivable he viewed his marriage as being in peril due to prominent reporting of his supposed affair.

    But even with all that considered, every election cycle Nevada politicians lose re-election due, at least in part, to negative media coverage. They usually either run again for another position in the next election(if not the office they were removed from) or, due to their political pedigree and connections, they can hire on at mid six figures with some prominent firm as a "consultant" or some such shit. And if they lose their marriage as a result of whatever the controversy was, they usually move on like most divorced people, but usually with some pretty good options for a future mate due to their financial situation and remaining public status.

    That's the way politicians usually handle these types of bumps in he road., but here we are presented with something dramatically different.

    It's still inconceivable to me that an attorney/public official would resort to such horrific extremes, which of course is what helps make this such a story.

    Or, who knows, forgive my naivete but perhaps he is innocent or at least will be found not guilty(despite the DNA on the clothes at his house identical to the ones worn by the person in the video fleeing the scene, and despite the situation with the car, his apparent motive, postings, etc.).

    I'd hire Tom Pitaro. He's getting on in years, but seems the no worse for it, so he'd be my first choice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree that this is what often happens, but he didn't seem to be doing particularly well. His house wasn't anything impressive. Maybe he is just a frugal individual, but he doesn't seem to be the mover and shaker you are discussing.

      Delete
    2. I'm not in criminal law. But functionally, at this point, does it even matter who his counsel is? The evidence seems so overwhelming. If you hire a great criminal defense attorney, what are you trying to accomplish? Something less than life? That just seems so improbable, if not impossible.

      Delete
    3. 1:55-perhps focus on the mental condition if it can possible help with defenses or mitigation. Pitaro, and a few others, have been real effective at that even when mental condition (at time of crime)did not initially appear to be a real factor.

      Also, top defense attorneys have made a real difference in cases even with evidence a lot more overwhelming than in this case.

      Delete
    4. The Telles case is all about plea bargaining now. The evidence of premeditation and deliberation is overwhelming, so he will be convicted of first degree murder with use of a deadly weapon if he goes to trial. He should take any deal that gives him less time than life in prison with parole eligibility after 40 years. I

      Delete
  10. 1:27-Tom Pitaro is also the first one who came to my mind. Bill Terry would also be on my short list, but is most sadly no longer with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brent Bryerson (spelling?) would also be a good choice.

      Delete
    2. It’s obvious neither one of you really practice crim law. Pitaro needs to be put out to pasture. Bill Terry was of course great, but hadn’t litigated a case in years. And Bryson doesn’t have the experience or the connections to be worth the money on a murder case. Oram is the man you call if you’re charged with murder.

      Delete
    3. Oram? What about pete Christiansen? Tomsheck? Marchese? Our favorite transparent poster, Nadig?

      Delete
    4. No mention of the Figster? Come on. He has his own wiki page!

      Delete
    5. I wouldn't use Marchese for a DUI. Ben and Pete are both solid. I am a Chris Rasmussen fan, though.

      Delete
    6. 9:06 suggests it is obvious we are out-of-touch, and know nothing of crim. law, if we would choose someone Pitaro. But, truth be told, the list of "go to" people, to represent a murder suspect, is pretty much the same list that it would have been 15 or 20 years ago(save for Bill Terry being deceased).

      And, as the one poster pointed out, Pitaro may be an older man, but there is no evidence of decline, so why should he be "put out to pasture.", as you suggest?

      If 9:06 and I, heaven forbid, are charged with serious crimes, 9:06 can choose from a list of self-promoting younger lawyers who have never successfully defended a murder case, but I will stake and gamble my liberty by hiring someone like Pitaro who has an incredible success rate over many decades.

      Plus, as to matters which can be negotiated, very high profile matters(such as murder cases with significant media coverage) would involve approval, and even involvement, of Wolfson in the negotiations, and someone like Pitaro would have a lot more good will built up over the decades with a fellow veteran criminal law attorney like Wolfson, who probably has little or no real knowledge or involvement with some of the younger attorneys suggested on this thread.

      Those attorneys are presumably fine, but I don't recall even one of them being involved with the successful defense of any murder case that attracted significant media coverage.

      Delete
    7. Actually, bot 9:06 p.m. and 9:03 a.m. have valid points.

      9:06 p.m. points out that there has been a changing of the guard and that the list of top-notch criminal defense attorneys has changed over the last couple decades.

      But 9:03 a.m. is correct that a few of the old war horses(like Pitaro) would still be an excellent choice.

      And yes, someone like Pitaro presumably has a pretty direct pipeline to Wolfson, if that becomes an important factor in the case. Also, some potential jurors may recognize his name and reputation, and perhaps that is of some benefit.

      It is interesting that some of the younger(or at least relatively younger) attorneys suggested by some on this thread,seldom seem to be mentioned by the media in association with any trials attracting media coverage.. But back in the 80's and 90's guys like Bill Terry, Pitaro, Goodman and John Momot, were constantly receiving media coverage relative to high profile cases.

      This could have something to do with changing technology, sources of how people now receive info.,etc. But back in the day when almost all our local news knowledge was restricted to the RJ and the three local evening news affiliates(3,8,and 13) guys like the ones I mentioned were constantly in the news relative to cases. But I don't seem to notice some of these younger attorneys mentioned on this thread ever receiving coverage relative to a high profile case.

      BTW, did Oscar Goodman return to criminal law defense to any extent, or is he essentially retired from practice?

      Delete
    8. Goodman is exempt Inactive with the SBN.

      Delete
  11. Sorry, but stabbing German to death was still a based alpha move.
    Sadly, he had no get away plan, other than to cut up that stupid hat.
    No way anyone was going to notice that hat, right Mensa?
    Wondering, was Telles absent the day they taught Crimlaw at Boyd?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Telles was a disaster at Boyd. He was forced out of student government for groping a 1L at an SBA party.

      Delete
    2. C'mon - is that true? Are you trolling? Did that really happen?

      Delete
    3. It was a PAD party, not an SBA party. Other than that, yes, that really happened.

      Delete
  12. Boyd class of 2010 judge Elana Lee Graham orders Telles held without bail.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He stabbed German 7 times!

      Delete
    2. Fuck fuck. I want to wear black as a Las Vegan. So tragic

      Delete
    3. Are they doing anything for German? I would like to pay my respects

      Delete
  13. Why is it “inconceivable” for the readers here that a “lawyer/educated” man would commit a crime? Lawyers not some super human species. Strip away all the accolades we LOVE to give ourselves and advertise, we are still just people. People do stupid, illogical things all the time. An executive just killed himself after announcing several lay-offs. Another local politician got a DUI after learning her Dad died. Men with gorgeous spouses still cheat and harass others. Lawyers are not immune to being irrational. The whole thing is tragic and bizarre.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 2:19-You are correct that educated, professional people have the same problems and vulnerabilities as anyone else.

      But still, I assume you will concede that the context of this situation makes it far more shocking than if some random homeless person, with let's say drug addiction and serious mental health problems, had killed German in a random attack or robbery.

      Here we have an attorney and county-wide office holder of a critically important position(even though the position is not too well known to most people), accused of butchering and gutting a prominent journalist for writing negative articles about the office holder.

      So, sorry 2:19, but it is, by any objective standard, a shocking, bizarre and very rare type situation(or more to the point, virtually unheard of. Quick...name the last time a politician butchered a journalist in cold blood).

      And pointing out how alarming and startling it is does not make one some elitist who suggests that lawyers are better than anyone else, or do not experience the same problems as anyone else.

      Delete
    2. Years ago, I read somewhere that terrorist groups often recruit suicide bombers not from the lower classes, but from the college population. Sigal chattah has the same degree that Tells does, and she said her political opponent should be hanging from a fking crane. So no, education can't take away the indelible stamp of our lowly origin, especially when we allow the guardrails of common decency and decorum to be removed and normalize a discourse of raw political violence.

      Delete
    3. @825
      That's the stupidest comparison I have read on this blog in weeks.

      Political Candidate uses a cultural hyperbole to demonstrate her distaste for her opponent does not even remotely equal an elected official stabbing a journalist 7 times for writing factual articles.

      Delete
    4. 1051, you missed the point. It is not that Chattah's comment and this crime against German are identical, any more than reckless endangerment and actual murder are identical crimes. Instead, it was that normalizing a violent political discourse like Chattah's so-called "cultural hyperbole" will have spillover effects at all levels of society which should not shock us. People act on what they hear from people in positions of power; that is a basic function of communication. Do you seriously believe there is no nexus between the rise in political violence and threats against elected officials, and the type of rhetoric some politicians / aspirants are increasingly using to characterize one another or the political process?

      Delete
    5. Told ya. TTHHWWWAAACCKK!

      Delete
    6. 8:25, and they both have the same degree as Aaron Ford, who was elected after having tax liens recorded against his property. All pieces of s@#$.

      Delete
    7. Ford is clearly a flawed candidate as well, but his problems are comparable only if you consider financial mismanagement to be as problematic as violence or the threats of violence.

      Delete
  14. Humor is a way to process. With that in mind:

    Who is getting cast in the inevitable movie/Netflix series?

    “Las Vegas: money, murder, and NOT the Mob?….coming September 2024.”

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Edward Norton at Telles. Shaved head.......

      Delete
    2. Evan Handler as Telles; Michael Keaton as German

      Delete
    3. Steven Mack as an aged Telles.. .German played by Richard Gere

      Delete
  15. Boyd ‘13 is lawyer hot.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Any news on Telles' court appearance? Attorney? Judge today and Judge who signed warrant?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The judge held Telles without bail. The judge noted that Telles's cell phone activity ceased during and immediately after the murder; that they found shoes and a cut-up hat at Telles's residence, each of which matched the items identified in the surveillance video; that German was stabbed 7 times; that DNA from German's hands and fingernails match Telles's DNA; German had defensive wounds.

      Delete
    2. Can someone explain how they confirmed the DNA results so quickly? It's my understanding that DNA generally takes several months to process. I know this is high profile, but how did they process it here?

      Delete
    3. Lombardo running for Governor.... that's all it takes for efficiency in DNA results

      Delete
    4. DNA is actually really quick to process. It’s the amount of work the lab has that causes the back log. Rush jobs usually require LT or captain approval and IDing a homicide suspect would probably be enough to get that approval.

      Delete
  17. The story is already in the Daily Mail and CNN.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And every other outlet in the English speaking world. And then some.

      Delete
    2. Yes, but noting on appearance on local or national news

      Delete
  18. Robert Telles is apparently the vice chair of the estate planning section of the state bar... I think we ought to leave him in place. He will soon have nothing but time to dedicate to the position.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let's elect him to the BOG!

      Delete
    2. I guarantee he is of higher character than Stan was.

      Delete
    3. Look, the Stan hater is back. He must of really messed with you.

      Delete
    4. Bog alert. Bog alert

      Delete
  19. He appeared in court. There are photos. Looks like bandages on both arms.

    ReplyDelete
  20. On Wednesday morning, a search warrant of Telles’ home was served, after which police recovered a vehicle, shoes, and a hat they said matched the description of a suspect they had been looking for in their investigation.
    Telles was taken to Metro headquarters and later released back to his home, where he was seen wearing a white paper suit because police had taken his clothes.

    Investigators confirmed his DNA matched DNA found under German’s fingernails and came back to arrest him at around 4 p.m.

    The standoff with police ensued until around 6:30 p.m. when Telles was taken to University Medical Center suffering from non-life-threatening self-inflicted stab wounds. He was then booked into the Clark County Detention Center.

    ReplyDelete