Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Special Treatment


  • Did you know we have a family treatment drug court? It was just awarded $874,097 Department of Justice grant. [eighthjdcourt blog]
  • DETR is taking Telsa to court over $650,000 of unpaid unemployment taxes. [TNI]
  • Check out this flow chart to help your clients determine if they have the right to vote in Nevada. [TNI]
  • Here's a look at the possible legal fallout from the post-fight McGregor-Khabib brawl. [SI]
  • The US Supreme Court is considering a case on the detention of immigrants. [Las Vegas Sun]
  • Judge Jim Crockett reversed his ruling nullifying an election result. [KTNV]
  • Did Metro give special attention to crime in the Sheriff's own neighborhood? [KTNV]

15 comments:

  1. In regarding to restoration of felons' right to vote, it says to refer your Federal Clients to the Secretary of State's office (not very helpful). I presume that means that the answer is a firm no?

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    1. Not necessarily. But I would send your clients to the Nevada ACLU or Restore the Vote for help rather than the Sec. of State's Office. No knock on the Sec. of State, just that ACLU and RtV are will walk people through the process step by step.

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    2. Restore the Vote is far more helpful than Secretary of State.

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  2. Whenz bar results?

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  3. There are certain restrictions on felons that still make sense, such as preclusion from gun ownership, etc.

    But the deprivation of the right to vote no longer makes sense. It is a right that most non-felons don't bother exercising. Seems to me you would want to encourage felons reintegrating positively into society, and obtain a feeling of self-worth by having some positive participation in the process, such as by voting, etc.

    So, again, I get that it makes sense for felons, particularly those convicted of violent crimes and/or those with a propensity toward violence, to be precluded from firearm ownership. By why deprive them of a civil right, such as having a role in the democratic process by becoming a voter, that can only be a positive development.

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    1. I disagree with you in this small regard. Preclusion from gun ownership for violent felons makes sense. Commit a domestic violence or a battery? Makes sense to preclude gun ownership. Bought a house and said on the loan documents that would be owner/occupied and it was not owner/occupied, why in the world would precluding you from owning a gun make sense? A blanket prohibition on gun ownership after they have completed their sentence and supposedly done everything to be reintegrated, why continue a lifetime of punishment which is not related to the crime?

      I agree with you that telling them that we want them to be good citizens but depriving them of the right to participate as citizens makes zero sense. Frankly if they care enough about the right to earn it back, they will be far more interested and active citizens than most of us. If we want felons to believe that they can rehabilitate and redeem, we have to offer them the opportunity.

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    2. 11:36 here. I had indicated that gun preclusion makes sense for those convicted of a violent felony.

      In the example you give(some guy who represented on loan documents that the home would be owner occupied, and subsequently that was not the case)should not be precluded from firearm ownership, IMO, even if the loan document representations somehow lead to a felony conviction.

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    3. Understand 4:55. When you said "There are certain restrictions on felons that still make sense, such as preclusion from gun ownership, etc." I just wanted to be clear that such restrictions for violent felonies make sense.

      PS: Lying on loan or refinance documents that a home would be owner/occupied (and then the foreclosure crisis hit) is absolutely a felony. Federal prisons are full of people who got snagged on this. Ask Luis Rojas what happens in this circumstance.

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    4. His situation was a little more involved than that.

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  4. bar exam results are up. 57% pass rate for July 2018.

    https://twitter.com/nevadabar/status/1050144030720516096

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    1. 57%? Wow. That's a bloodbath, especially for July takers.

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    2. Do we know the Boyd rate yet?

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  5. Heard a rumor that a district court judge would retire in January? Any idea who?

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