Tuesday, April 11, 2017

My, What A Distinguished Fellow You Have!


  • Former Senator Harry Reid is joining Boyd Law School as its first distinguished fellow in law and policy. [RJ]
  • Nicholas Woodridge, attorney for an MIT grad charged facing terrorism accusations, says his client was overcharged. [RJ]
  • April Parks appeared in court yesterday. [8NewsNow]

38 comments:

  1. No Harry Reid at the law school. Dude is crooked.

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    1. I think this is a mistake for the law school. We have always donated and supported the school but this gives me real pause.

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    2. 1:13 PM is a victim of tribal politics.

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    3. I am a die-hard Republican who cannot stand Reid's politics. With that said, name anyone else on UNLV's Staff that would move the meter for any prospective students. But the chance to learn policy from someone who was the Minority Whip for 4 years, Majority Whip for 2 years, Minority Leader and then ran the United States Senate for 9 years- that moves the meter. So we can make snarky comments about the political part of this appointment; but the splash and PR part of the appointment cannot be denied.

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    4. There is nothing snarky about the truth.

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    5. What are they or rather we paying him in salary and benefits?

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    6. Far less than we are spending on Trump's travel

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    7. I vote we put Harry in charge of the PE Dept...specifically training students on the proper use of exercise equipment :)

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  2. Eric Johnson taught at UNLV. Being crooked never disqualified him.

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  3. Is Wooldridge intentionally trying to impersonate Hunter S. Thompson on his website?

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  4. Judge Bybee taught at the law school. Being Mormon, a federal appellate judge, AND writing a memo to then President Bush saying waterboarding and other forms of torture is A-OK doesn't disqualify you either.

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  5. These appointments, whether Judge Bybee or Harry Reid, are all about the silliest, yet most sought after currency in legal academia - PRESTIGE.

    You can bet that both men's names have been and will be plastered all over glossy materials sent to unsuspecting senior undergrads and LSAT takers, luring these youngsters into an uncertain financial future and just under $100k in non-BKable debt. These youngsters may soon find themselves crushed by their debt while working for a CD or insurance defense firm, but dammit, can you put a price tag on a degree from a law school where Harry Reid is a "fellow"?

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  6. i actually went to Boyd because it was affordable compared to most other law schools. I wasn't getting into a Top 20 law school, so I knew it wouldn't really matter which regional law school i went. I do think it may help with Boyd's overall ranking if down the road there are some materials released in academia from Senator Reid. Maybe even bring in other big name politicians to teach or whatever. But who knows

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    1. Agreed. Can you imagine the construction-defect and document review titans that will be spawned under Senator Reid's astute tutelage?

      And you were impressed by Boyd '13!

      Watch out world!

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    2. UNLV should get Steve Jones or Stan Hunterton, although isn't he already there?

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  7. They should bring in Doug "Dough Boy" Smith in. There are quite a few other members of the judiciary who are good picks too.

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  8. Reid should teach ethics to the younglings. I would pay to audit that class.

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  9. Replies
    1. http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/ex-doctor-in-las-vegas-hepatitis-c-case-dies-in-prison-custody/690508866

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  10. No comments about the CLE suspended list? Quite a few names on that list and a number of them were told they couldn't appear yesterday in open court. It was quite entertaining.

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    1. The compliance report that you get from them is almost purposefully confusing. I've never been able to decipher it, but I don't stand around doing nothing until I'm suspended either.

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  11. Where is the list?

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  12. Come on, you guys think this thing with Harry is anything other than title-only?

    He ain't walking from Searchlight to teach 1Ls the difference between Id. and Ibid.

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    1. Harry doesn't live in Searchlight anymore

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    2. Thanks for the heads up buddy. And here I was thinking he drives a Rolls Royce and still lived in the house he grew up in

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    3. He'll be paid plus given benefits whether he does anything or not. how much and who pays.

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  13. After all that discussion about the doctor dragged off the United Airlines plane, it was learned that the doctor was a convicted felon and had lost his license. There is always more to the story about folks who resist the orders or directions to leave the plane. We are so quick to judge based on videos and "flash mob" mentality. http://www.tmz.com/2017/04/11/united-airlines-doctor-convicted-drugs-sex/

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    1. "We are so quick to judge based on videos and "flash mob" mentality."

      CITES TMZ.

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    2. Well, obviously he had it coming then.

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    3. Also, he was an internist. Not exactly an "I absolutely must make my flight or PEOPLE WILL DIE"

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    4. I'm not sure I care who he was or his statements that he had to be somewhere and wasn't getting off the plane, to be material to my thought that United mistreated one of its customers in such a way that dehumanized the person. For all I care, the guy could be a convicted murderer on parole (which doesn't make as good as a story as a doctor claiming he had to be somewhere), but if United had treated a paroled convicted murderer the same, I'd still think United f'd up and mistreated a paying customer to try and fix its own mistake of overbooking and allowing the customer to be seated before they figured out they needed his seat for one of their own employees.

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    5. He was a pulmonologist. He had gotten his license back. And precisely what does a conviction 13 years ago have to go with the right of a police officer to beat the snot out of him for sitting in the seat for which he paid and was instructed to sit by the airline?

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    6. He'd gotten his license back with the restriction that he practice internal medicine 1x a week.

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    7. 9:00 am's comment made me curious so I went and pulled the Amended Order against this doctor from the KY Board of Medical Examiners. It was interesting because it goes to an issue relevant to our profession.

      The KY Board found evidence that Dr. Dao had been suspended so long that he basically did not remember how to practice medicine competently, that they had so thoroughly kept him out of the practice that they destroyed him as a doctor. The ABA Standards state that suspensions of lawyers should not be longer than 3 years because lawyers lose competence. We seem really quick to want to suspend people for years and years when it doesn't really protect the public it just makes them less competent when they are allowed to return.

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    8. 9:23 raises an interesting point. Suspension for long periods of time should allow for, or mandate, serving as a law clerk grunt for a portion of the time to keep sharp, and maybe mentoring the first couple of months upon return to practice. IF you suspend someone for a long time, you kill the skill.

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  14. I guess no one spoke of April Parks because they are busy finding new lackey guardians to help exploit the vulnerable.

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    1. This blog has talked about April Parks every time she is in the news (see the day before this one). It is a frequent topic here.

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