Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Centerfold


  • The Nevada Senate Judiciary Committee discussed a proposed bill that would require people convicted of stalking or with extended protection orders against them to surrender their firearms. Judges already have the option to order this. [RJ]
  • Governor Sandoval signed into law AB 99, mandating that courts and foster care facilities treat transgender children as their identifying gender. [KNPR]
  • Marc Randazza is representing an officer in a federal suit against Metro regarding its unconstitutionally vague social media policy. [RJ]
  • Former Dr. Depak Desai, serving a life sentence for his role in the Hep-C outbreak, died in prison. [Fox5Vegas
  • Someone in the comments yesterday mentioned a list of CLE-suspended lawyers. Anyone have a link to the list?

33 comments:

  1. If Hell exists, there is a special place there for Desai.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Careful, Sparky. There is probably a special place there for you too.

      Delete
    2. I agree with 9:24. I think it is usually cruel and immoral to take any pleasure, or act at all sanctimonious and superior, about the misfortunes and tragedies of others. After all, I need to be real careful because, speaking of Hell, there may be a special place reserved for me.

      That being understood, and while recognizing that 9:14 expressed his/her opinion in an extremely harsh, ultra-condemning manner which indicates a personality lacking in sufficient compassion or empathy, I must agree that Desai's legacy is a very dark one. He will be remembered as someone who consistently endangered the health, safety, and even the lives, of his patients in order to save a few bucks.

      Delete
    3. Paraphrase of 10:40 -

      9:14's comment was cruel and lacked compassion, and I agree with it.

      Delete
    4. 9:14 here. Not a lack of compassion or empathy, bur rather reality. I don't take any pleasure whatsoever in the death of another, but now that he is dead, he deserves whatever punishment there may be in the afterlife. Why do people feel compelled to not speak ill of human garbage? It is okay to speak ill of the person while they are alive, but after death somehow they are now elevated to a special position? Desai was a despicable piece of human trash, and his death does not change that.

      But, if you need it to make you feel better about yourself and convince yourself what a compassionate person you are, go ahead and pat your self on the back because you refrain from speaking ill of the dead.

      Delete
    5. Let he among you who is without sin cast the first stone.

      Delete
    6. Since when have people had compassion on this website? Seriously? Stubbs, Voldemort, Hafter, Boyd Class of 2013, Trump are all EXCELLENT topics for scorn. A guy who hastily ripped tubes out of people's asses to save a buck, made millions, put hundreds of people's lives at risk and then paid through the nose to get out of it using every bullshit excuse in the world is a cautionary tale, not an object for sympathy. Quit being lame and go suck a bag o dicks.

      Delete
    7. (bounces rock off of 11:25's skull and laughs because sin is a construct designed to keep children and churchgoers in line)

      Delete
    8. Stop with the holier than thou, I would like to see how you would feel about Desai if your loved one or friend was infected with the lift threatening Hep C. Could care less what you a-holes call me for posting this.

      Delete
    9. 9:14--10:40 here again.

      I'm not saying I'm any better or more compassionate than anyone else. In fact, I indicated that there may in fact be a place reserved for me in Hell.

      I agree with your sentiments about Desai, which I made clear, but I do think some level of restraint and decorum is necessitated, if only to spare his loved ones who presumably had nothing to do with this mess. By not recognizing that, I do believe that your insistence to state your contempt so directly and emphatically, right after the person died, does indicate that perhaps you(as well as, admittedly, myself and others)should be a little more private or circumspect with how we can address such contempt. Telling our friends or acquaintances exactly what we think of the man is a lot more acceptable than posting your contempt of him in very public forum, wherein his family members could possibly learn of it.

      I share your views of the man, but my concern is that we, as people, often think it's proper to express our very public contempt of someone and then justify it by saying that we are people who tell it like it is, direct and without b.s.

      We , I believe, should reflect on the feelings of family members left behind, and also the fact that such contempt may no longer be necessary as he was(thankfully) punished for his crimes and in fact died in prison. That all said, I recognize that we need to have a million times more sympathy for his victims than his family members.

      As to not speaking ill of the dead, there is a certain superstitious element which may also have religious overtones for some. Those who are of more recent European extraction(particularly eastern Europe)will remember their parents or grandparents often insisting that we must not speak ill of the dead, and that does take root with us to an extent.

      Delete
    10. I think the problem is we assume other cultures and peoples think like us. He belonged to a group that fundamentally believes exploiting others is okay. He was crushed when it turned out it got him imprisoned.

      The happiest crooks I know are the ones who get it. I commit the crime, and if caught, I serve the time. Desai truly never understood he did anything wrong, just like some Iraqi "teen" who rapes a woman in Sweden genuinely doesn't understand why giving a woman what she clearly deserves is "wrong."

      Thus, we should pray that he finds truth and forgiveness on the other side. My doctors are Christians for a reason.

      Delete
    11. 12:25 - Is that reason because you are a xenophobic hick? How do you go about vetting them to make sure they're Christian - or are you just assuming non-Latino brown people aren't Christian and working from there. Jackass

      Delete
    12. My doctor is LDS. Does that count?

      Delete
    13. 1:12, 12:25 was clearly defining "group" as doctors, how is that xenophobic?

      Delete
    14. 2:13: not so "clearly."

      Delete
    15. If you were trash in life, then you are trash in death. He was trash. Ethnic and cultural stereotypes have nothing to do with it.

      Delete
    16. @2:13 - he said referenced "other cultures and peoples" and then said Desai was part of a specific group that was okay with exploiting others. I don't think doctors are generally considered other cultures or peoples.

      Delete
    17. That is not how I read it, but on second reading I think the reference was unclear so I'll give 2:13 the benefit of the doubt.

      Delete
    18. As a lifelong criminal defense attorney I don't wish harm on anyone. But one of my inmate client's mother and father were both infected by Desai--his mother died while he was incarcerated at ESP and he was refused funeral privileges. His father may die before his release. Desai literally RAVAGED families for money, and I don't appreciate that. I don't appreciate anyone who uses his power to commit crime. I'm sure he's getting his now.

      Delete
  2. Dear State Bar of Nevada:
    Please stop with the Facebook editorial commentary. I know, the ABA Journal posts articles on news stories of the day; but the ABA reports (republishes) them as news stories. You make juvenile comments that are really beneath a regulatory organization (which the ABA is not). If you want to post links and information to legal resources, terrific. But leaving some high school dropout with access to your Facebook page to make comments makes me cringe. Or does Kim Farmer have nothing better to do with her day than post crap on Facebook?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mountain, meet molehill. Molehill, mountain.

      Delete
    2. You are paying $450.00 pesos for that, and another $40.00 or $50.00 for the continuing legal ed board to not keep track of your cle credits.

      Delete
    3. Sure its a molehill. But its cringeworthy and not OK. And stop it.

      Delete
    4. 10:26 a.m. here - I think I scrolled until I got bored and ran across 2 comments that weren't generic, and none were worthy of even whining - much less crying - about it. So if anyone who has the vapors from all those horrible editorial comments, please post them so I can join in the taking of the waters.

      Delete
  3. What about the CLE suspension list though?
    Link?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. https://www.nvbar.org/wp-content/uploads/NevadaLawyer_April2017_BarCounselReport.pdf

      Delete
    2. Nothing in that link about CLE suspensions.

      Delete
    3. That list is going to appear in the May issue of Nevada Lawyer.

      Delete
  4. 10:55--1:40 here. Yes, your paraphrase of my view of 9:14 is entirely correct.

    I think 9:14 could probably exercise a little more restraint. Yet I made it clear I agree with his remarks. I guess I'm speaking out of both sides of my mouth when I say that because, yes, I do think Desai's actions were contemptible beyond measure. Not sure anyone could disagree with the fact that his actions condemned many to extended suffering, and even death, and for what? To save a few measly dollars. Sickening beyond belief. But, wait, I promised I would exercise more restraint than 9:14, but I'm doing a miserable job about it.

    In fact, now that I reflect further and remember everything about the whole tragic Desai fiasco, I feel I must withdraw the negative remarks I made about the approach of 9:14.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ramsey v. City of North Las Vegas published today-- reversed and remanded. Cannot do a recall election for Judges; can only remove judges through the judicial discipline system.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was a 4-2 decision, with Pickering and Douglas dissenting and Stiglich sitting out.

      Delete