Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Let's Stip To That


  • Conrad Hafen stipulated that he will never be a judge in Nevada again. [RJ; Stipulation]
  • Judge Doug Smith also stipulated to a public reprimand for misleading campaign endorsements  made by his judicial campaign. [Stipulation]
  • The Supreme Court is now in its new building downtown. [RJ]
  • Could a change in property taxes happen this legislative session? [Las Vegas Sun]

30 comments:

  1. It appears the Chapman Law Group has joined Fennemore Craig.

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    1. That's all fine and good, but how many BMW i8s does Chapman have? Is FC just picking up a bunch of Acura chumps?

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    2. It seems odd that you would fold your practice to simply be "of counsel" at a regional firm....

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    3. Stable money. Prestige of the bigger firm. Allows you to probably collect fees if you have client matters in jurisdictions which FC already has offices.

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    4. "Prestige" is the most overrated commodity of all-time. So worthless, and yet so coveted.

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  2. I didn't realize there was an upcoming election until I saw the plethora of campaign posters hanging in every vacant lot in town. I haven't received any of the mass emails begging me to attend fundraisers or urging me to vote. Anything (or anyone) we should care about?

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    1. Hey 10:30: I'd take that as a resounding NO!

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  3. Also, last day to pay your Bar dues without incurring the Wrath of Stan and a late fee.

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    1. Dear 10:53: Thanks for the heads up. I had totally spaced it for both states I'm admitted in.

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    2. You pay high bar dues so they can have hideous bar conventions that no one except Kathy England goes to, and to pay for asshole bar counsel.

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    3. Hot take 11:36!

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    4. Honestly OBC is a huge waste of money which is causing huge wastes of time.

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    5. Austin, TX. Who the hell in the SBN's office has relatives in Austin? Anyone? Because I can't think of another reason the State Bar of NEVADA should have its annual meeting in Austin.

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    6. Because Kim Farmer wants to visit Austin and have her airfare and hotel paid.

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    7. The OBC sucks. Biggest piece of pork barrel outside of DC, or my name ain't Col. Sanders.

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    8. Austin rocks. Don't mess with Texas, y'all.

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    9. I don't want to mess with Texas. I want nothing to do with Texas. I sure as hell don't want to send Texas part of my high-as-hell bar dues when Las Vegas has tons of convention space, Tahoe is beautiful, and Carson City could use the excitement once the Legislative session is over. Hell, meet in the second room down the hall in the Bunny Ranch.

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  4. I do civil almost 100% of my time, but I've done some minor criminal cases for my civil clients over the past 10 years. It's hard to sit through a justice court criminal calendar and not cringe at the level of legal practice. Counsels arguments are, "well because." Prosecutors don't know the facts of the charges, defense attorney don't know them either. I once saw a judge deny a "trespass" plea bargain to an alleged prostitute because neither counsel could tell the judge which property the prostitute was to be trespassed from. When the prostitute attempted to whisper to her counsel which hotel she was arrested at, he shushed her.

    Whether you agree or disagree with Hafen's tactics (personally, I disagree, judges should not be handcuffing their court's judicial officers for anything less than where there is a clear and present physical threat). But, it seems like this decisions will tie judges hands in the future to address counsel's carelessness.

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    1. Dude, I know I'm not addressing your point but STFU. You stay in Civil High School and we'll stay in Crim High School. You have no idea what we do and you like to think you know what you're doing on "minor criminal matters" (newsflash, you fucked em up) and so you dabble. I don't know what I'm doing on "minor civil matters" and I sure as shit don't represent clients on those, I refer them out. I'm not a PD or a DA but a majority of their work is triage, deal it or set it for trial and they need to identify that early so as to allocate resources. So if they don't know what hotel a 50 time hooker was at this time cause she's been trespassed from all of them, then cut them a break.

      Our job is to identify which cases are going to trial and get there quickly. Your job appears to be threaten to go to trial, bluster about your "trial experience", and then bury everybody in motion work to bill the shit out of the case so that you can settle right before you go to trial. Civil on both sides make good money doing it and good on you, but we make our money and our reputation on doing the direct opposite, so stop judging the shit you don't know.

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    2. "Triage" doesn't seem like the best practice when you hold your client's (or a citizen's) freedom in your hands.

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    3. knowing which hotel a pro is getting banned from is pretty low on the list of priorities. The pro can ask for a trial if she wants.
      "citizen's freedom in your hands"...good one.
      get a clue

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    4. I am not taking either side here, but I was a clerk in state court for a split docket and I will say I have seen both civil and criminal lawyers equally be very good at what they do, as well as equally as idiotic. Some lawyers, are just good while others are not. Doesn't matter what field of law. Even Family law has their fair share of good attorneys (at least I hope lol)

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    5. The level of practice in JC Crim matters is shocking to business court litigators who put their toe into the JC waters. But 11:54 has a point which is that that is the game there. You don't overlawyer matters. You run the procedural gamut and play the game. Yes 12:15, it is shocking to the uninitiated but as someone who was in your shoes, that's all it is. We aren't initiated into that world, we don't want to be initiated into that world so do your thing and get out of that world.

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    6. I do civil work, and I'm not going to comment on crim because I don't know anything about it. But I have had the "pleasure" of dipping my toe into some family law litigation -- and it is also a different world... one where the rules don't seem to matter. (No written opposition to a motion until the day before the hearing? No problem.) I guess it works for some people, but it's not for me.

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    7. @11:21 - your comment doesn't make any sense. Who got handcuffed for "carelessness?" Seems like you just wanted to vent about criminal def attorneys (prob after you dabbled in crim and lost.) The PD was handcuffed for trying to do her job. I don't think I ever heard she was even accused of being careless. She was bullied into silence.

      @11:54 *mic drop*

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  5. 11:21: the four different incidents in the complaint show a pattern of abuse, only one involves a lawyer. The others are just plain abuse of power.

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  6. So, is Judge Doug Smith going to get some of his money back?

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    1. Harmony's dad will never give him any of his money back.

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  7. Speaking of never be a judge again, the rumor is that North Las Vegas paid Catherine Ramsey in secret to leave the bench for good this week. It's a victory for everyone that wanted the far less ethical judge to handle the entire court from now on.

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