Friday, January 13, 2017

The Bobbie


  • Judge Nancy Allf confirmed an arbitrator's award of $28.7 million for Tiberti against Bishop Gorman. [RJ]
  • The Stadium Authority has the list of law firms to consider for legal counsel down to three. [RJ]
  • Here's a quick look at Judge Barker's career. [eighthjdcourt blog]

13 comments:

  1. Ultimately, the problem is that public money simply isn’t available for building football stadiums when any sort of public vote is required. It’s one thing to get the politicians in Minnesota, St. Louis, or Las Vegas to play ball; it’s quite another to get the citizens to vote for subsidies to billionaires. -- Posted by Mike Florio

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  2. anyone have a realistic idea of how much guys Eglet, CPK, Harris, etc make in a year as take home?

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    1. Eglet and Harris themselves or their minions?

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    2. More than me :-(

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  3. 68 is pretty young. Damn good sandwiches though.

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  4. Most people in important leadership positions, are often in it, at least to some extent, for ego, self-fulfillment, recognition from others, power or perceived power, name-recognition, preferential treatment and deference, and things of that nature. They are seldom in it purely for "the service of the public". If they truly were in it solely for the public good, they would far more often take positions that, although unpopular today, are for the public good in the long run, even if taking that position creates the chance that the individual may put their leadership position at risk. That is why when these leaders are occasionally praised for taking bold and decisive decisions, usually such decisions, once you peel away at it a bit, reveals that taking such position is actually the safer coarse to better enable them to continu in their position. Few people in leadership positions routinely make decisions that are in the long-range public good, but that may threaten the leader continuing to hold his/her position.

    This is why I find Chief Judge Barker to be quite refreshing. I am not speaking of his specific administrative decisions or how good, or not good they were. I will leave that to others with far more knowledge of such matters to debate. I am speaking of the person. He seemed really principled, result-oriented,fair and respectful to all positions, and not particularly interested in attention, credit, or the lime light.

    No, I am not Judge Barker. In point of fact, I don't know him all that well. But he seemed about as humble and down-to-earth as is possible while still holding a position of incredible importance and prestige. At least that's how I perceived him. Certainly, others may have perceived him quite differently.

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    1. Love this post and agree with it 100%

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    2. Like Judge Barker. Wish more judges were like him. So few let the power go to their heads.

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    3. @12:34 paragraph breaks are your friend.

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    4. Judge Barker retired as many public attorneys have before him so he could double dip and get great (easy) pay as senior judge. There are some dedicated people in public service, but their dedication becomes very apparent when you see what they do immediately upon becoming eligible for a cush retirement.

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