Monday, January 9, 2017

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  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    NEVADA APPELLATE COURTS CLOSED MONDAY DUE TO CATASTROPHIC FLOODING
    CARSON CITY, Nevada, Jan. 8, 2017 - The Supreme Court and the Nevada Court of Appeals in Carson City will be closed Monday (1/9) due to the catastrophic flooding in northern Nevada. All deadlines will be extended one (1) court calendar day to accommodate this rare occurrence.  The Las Vegas location of both courts will be open.
  • Likewise the investiture ceremony for Justice Stiglich is postponed, to be rescheduled at a later date.
  • One of our readers would like your input/assistance on the following question: "I'm an associate at a small firm and my name is associated with several cases handled by the firm. I'm leaving to go to another opportunity and am not taking any of these cases with me. I do not want to have my name on those files and be potentially liable for anything going forward. What steps do I need to take to protect myself? Just a notice that I'm no longer associated with the firm?"

14 comments:

  1. Unless your current firm sucks major ass they should notice your substitution.

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  2. If you are leaving the firm you have nothing to worry about. They will remove your name from pleadings going forward. You are not the first associate to leave, so they know what to do.

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  3. The firm SHOULD file notices upon your departure. However go to Odyssey and see if your name is the official name on those files. If so, insist on a Notice of Substitution before you leave to make sure that your name is not the name associated with those files any longer and you are not contacted by the Court regarding those matters.

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  4. If you handle bankruptcy matters, a simple notice won't work. You'll need either a substitution of counsel ( signed by you, the debtor/creditor/client, and your prior firm - filed and an order submitted for issuance by the judge) or if they refuse (which would be illogical), then file a motion to withdraw and set a hearing. I can't imagine your firm refusing to sign a substitution though.

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  5. A notice of disassociation of counsel is fairly common.

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  6. All of you are valid in your observations, and his name will presumably be removed from future pleadings, but he seems to be looking for some sort of guarantee, and there is none to be had. In the highly unfortunate(and, hopefully, unlikely) event that there is a malpractice suit in any of these case he worked on, the Plaintiff will name, as Defendants, at least initially, anyone who was within 5 miles of even touching this file. If his name crops up on filings, discovery, correspondence, and the like, he will be named as a defendant by any competent Plaintiff's Malpractice Attorney. he may eventually be dismissed out. The firm may be responsible for any final judgment without him being required to contribute. He may even be able to have the attorney representing the firm to represent him as well(often a bad idea as he and his former colleagues may now be at cross purposes). All that, and then some, may occur. Plus the malpractice case may be shitty and eventually go nowhere.
    He may wind up with few if any problems. Just about anything can happen--except Plaintiff's attorney forgetting to sue him. He will be listed individually as a defendant, even though his former employer may be the first listed, primary, and most deep-pocketed, defendant. So, not to be disagreeable, but I don't concurr that him taking the steps you all suggest(which are good suggestions) insulates him from being named in a subsequent law suit concerning a case he worked on. But he will be protected as to the issue he raises about not being legally liable for future activity on the case. But if there is a verdict or settlement on a case he worked on, it is often difficult to decipher from the trier of fact the proportionate culpability that occurred prior to him leaving the firm vs. the percentage of malpractice attributable to the time period after he left the case and the firm. He should consult someone skilled in such matters if he believes any of these cases may have been mishandled by the firm to the extent that malpractice litigation could ensue.

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  7. Is it just me or does new supreme courthouse with the justice and her sword on top look an awful lot like the golden angel on mormon temples?

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    1. It's just you.

      Random aside: loved the NPR Mormon leaks interview today - wonder if they'll get backlash from LDS firms who have sponsored them in the past.

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    2. Definitely not just you - it looks a lot like a moroni statue, and also like the angel from that old hotel on Fremont - but I think it's supposed to be a duplicate of the statue from the Old Bailey. I can't wait to watch lightning strike it.

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  8. This should be fun to watch

    Jennifer V. Abrams; Abrams & Mayo Law Firm
    v.
    Louis C. Schneider; Law Offices of Louis C. Schneider LLC; Steve W. Swanson; Heidi J. Hanusa; Christina Ortiz; Johnny Spicer; Don Woolbright; Veterans in Politics International Inc.; Sanson Corp.; Karen Steelmon; Does

    Defamation. Defendants published an "attack article" that defamed plaintiff attorney and law firm by falsely claiming plaintiff attacked a judge, is unethical and made other disparaging comments.

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    1. What's the case #?

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Abrams.... hot or not?

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  9. Looks like it is case number A-17-749318-C

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