Thursday, September 22, 2016

Autumnal Equinox 2016


  • Interviews of applicants for the Supreme Court seat vacated by Justice Nancy Saitta will be conducted on October 17-18. [nvcourts.gov]
  • Las Vegas City Councilman Ricki Barlow is being investigated by the FBI. Who is his attorney? [RJ]
  • Things are falling into place for Governor Sandoval to call a special session on the NFL stadium proposal to take place as soon as October 7. That means he has the votes right? [RJ]
  • Is wearing a Black Lives Matter button more a statement of solidarity than a political statement? [RJ; Las Vegas Sun; Fox5Vegas]

29 comments:

  1. It looks like Richard Wright is representing Barlow.

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    1. well then, you know he did it

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  2. based on twitter reports from the courtroom, sounds like Herndon is handling BLM buttons like a champ.

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  3. He said his policy has nothing to do with the movement. Attorney said she understood and took off her button is the short version.

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    1. Herndon is on the very small list of judges that I won't kick, and usually plaintiff's counsel won't kick either. Good judge.

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    2. This is right. He's one of the best on the bench.

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    3. As a civil plaintiff lawyer, I disagree. He doesn't understand certain civil issues very well. And has been appealed.

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    4. 3:10,

      Speaking as a civil defense attorney, I can see why you wouldn't like him. But I think he understands the issues well. True, he doesn't always assume the pro-plaintiff view of ambiguous case law that the plaintiff's bar has become accustomed to having.

      Who hasn't been appealed? Has he been reversed more often than the civil judges you probably like--Walsh, Leavitt, Williams, Earley, etc.?

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  4. The EJDC bailiffs make political statements all the time. Family court bailiffs wrongfully arrested and choked a woman, thank you, Leonard Cash. You get close to random pat downs through the security line, even as an attorney, especially females. You get treated like shit if you show up for your civic duty for jury duty. Judges don't care about that. But we care about lapel pins?

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    1. Wait, what? You get random pat downs in the security line? Eight years and I've never received a pat down. The most they ever do is use the wand.

      But I don't understand what that has to do with making a political statement, unless you're just being facetious.

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    2. Um, they get frisky with those wands. Be there when there detectors don't work. Worse than the TSA. Open those purses, too. Glad you have not been touched by them and their wands.

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    3. Sorry, I cannot work with stupid. Talked to other attorneys who experienced the same thing. Should be looked into.

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    4. I didn't mean to sound as though I doubted your story. It honestly wouldn't surprise me if female attorneys got random pat downs in the security line. I just didn't know they did them, probably because I'm a middle-aged white dude and they have no desire to get closer to me than a wand.

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    5. I go through the security line with my bar card visible, and I have comments made about my appearance. Female, yes. Disgusting, yes. Judges, wake the fuck up, and look into this. They are your bailiffs.

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    6. Court admin are the biggest aholes going. Report it to the judge on the record. Make it their problem. They are elected officials who are getting paid with our tax dollars.

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    7. Who has the 8th judic bailiff who likes punky brewster with the really bad hi-lights?

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    8. I am a middle aged guy, not always gettin' enough lovin' from my wife. How do I get one of these egregious pat-downs you're all talkin' about?

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    9. Hey, 2:33, you repent and go home to your wife and make her yours tonight! As the head of the home, you must establish and maintain your position, both figuratively and, well, physically.

      These punk bailiffs harass women precisely because they can't get a real woman to submit to them in holy marriage.

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  5. A statement of solidarity IS a political statement.

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    1. See, e.g., Badu's black arm band she wore to court today.

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    2. Bailiffs are solidarity. Power struggle with attorneys. Seen them near arrest attorneys for no reason.

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    3. Did Badu really do that? Now we are seeking out the African America woman. Justice is served. What time is dinner on the table? When I come home, I want dinner on the table.

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    4. Is placing a black band over a badge a political statement? I am just unclear on what constitutes political statements. What if you wear an American flag pin or 7th amendment pin.

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    5. I'm trying to imagine what a 7th Amendment pin would look like. A dozen faceless figures sitting on a $20 bill?

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    6. True story: Saw guy headed into a seventh floor courtroom this morning wearing a "Vote For Pedro" t-shirt and wanted to follow him in and see if the court considered it a political statement.

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