Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Hot Vegas


  • It looks like Nevada PUC general counsel Carolyn Tanner is out after a pseudonymous tweet. [RJ]
  • A judicial panel approved spending $3 million to fund 34 specialty courts. [RJ]
  • Here's a Q&A with Michael Feder of Dickinson Wright. [Vegas Inc.]

31 comments:

  1. Tanner is an idiot. Great work by an average member of the public. Just shows how the PUC is being unfair.

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  2. Solar power is total baloney. I have a client that can't sell their house because of the solar panels. Nice house but most of the buyers don't want the solar panels. Solar energy is like a time share. You are sold solar energy like a time share. After you buy it, you have buyer's remorse. My client was sold it at a home show. Then when you have it, it is too late and you are stuck in a long term agreement. The folks getting signatures for the petitions are paid by Elon Musk to get signatures. They are not volunteers. I complained about them following me to my car and inside the grocery store. How does solar energy work when there is no sun? It doesn't. You need to buy your power from the power company. Having said that what this attorney did was stupid.

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    1. The realtor told my client that the house will only sell if they give away the solar, eat the cost, or remove. Otherwise they have to discount their house ten to twenty per cent. Even then it is a problem. It is not like a swimming pool which can be filled in for $2,000.00. Very few buyers want solar built into the house. Try selling your house with the rooftop panels. Good luck.

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    2. So if your house is worth $400k, panels are going to diminish the resale value by $40-$80k? Does this realtor happen to work for Warren Buffett?

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    3. Ha! Who exactly did you complain to? Warren Buffett is already paying you to write this, troll. Did you complain to him?! But, thanks for stepping up to the plate to defend an abusive monopoly. They truly need your help and support.

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    4. Don't work for Warren Buffet or Elon Musk (Solar City). This is the hottest real estate market since 2007. My client's house won't sell. It is in a choice neighborhood and is priced in the $300s. Potential buyers complain about the solar. They don't want it. It costs money to remove and buy out the contract. Like I said, it reminds me of a time share. My client was high pressured sold it. I think they are stuck. Just a warning to others to carefully consider the consequences of what you are getting into. It is not like solar hot water or solar heating the pool. These systems are a long term commitment. It takes years to recoup your investment. Obviously it is highly profitable.

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    5. So it isn't the solar panels or the savings that sucks, it the economic trap and nightmare that the PUC and NV Energy colluded to create that is the problem?

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    6. If you do your research, there are more ways to solar panel your home besides Solar City. Having done a fair amount of research, I wouldn't ever be suckered into SC, or any kind of a lease option. But even paying cash for the panels and owning them outright isn't a good deal anymore, thanks to the recent PUC decision.

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  3. Solar will only truly work for you when you have a battery storage system an your panels generate energy in excess of your usage during the day that gets stored in the battery system and then used by you when the panels aren't generating adequate energy. Depending on the power company at night to 'reimburse' you for the 'energy credits' that you feed the power company during the day is not an efficient way for you to operate. It's cheaper of course because a battery system and a whole-house inverter aren't cheap but doing so will allow you to not care what NV Energy does with their energy credit issues.

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    1. Why did you put "reimburse' in quotation marks? Doesn't the solar generating consumer sell excess energy to NV energy at a cheaper rate than they would otherwise pay? I don't get how that isn't good for all consumers.

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    2. I thought the whole fiasco was because NV Energy was having to pay the solar producers (i.e., homeowners with solar panels) the highest price possible for each megawatt of power. Isn't NV Energy's argument that the solar producers should just get market rate, not some artificially inflated rate. ... or am I completely off and have been listening to the NV Energy folks to much.

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    3. Thats the Kool-Aide line from NV Energy. They managed to fuck every single paying customer. There are no market forces at work, just a cabal of insiders forcing the citizens to bend over and take it. They managed to force it down to 25% of the market rate. Thats when every single solar customer got raped, every future customer got raped, and all 6,000+ solar jobs went *POOF* in the night.

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    4. You are right. Solar power is the most expensive power you can buy/sell. It does not make sense. There are two sides to this story. Everyone else is paying more so solar suckers can pay less. This makes us the suckers to pay for them.

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    5. But what was the rate before "they managed to force it down to 25% of the market rate."

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    6. The 3 person panel, "...triple a fixed fee and cut the value of incentive credits for rooftop solar customers...The three-member Public Utilities Commission adopted a proposed order that would reduce by 75 percent the amount NV Energy pays customers for excess power their solar panels produce and change the flat service rate for customers with solar panels."

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  4. I have roof-top solar through Solar City. I like it, even after the PUC net metering fiasco. My bill is still lower than it was with NV energy by about 20%. Was 30% lower before the change.

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    1. I agree. My bill is significantly lower with SolarCity. Overall I have been pretty happy with SolarCity and having solar power.

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    2. I'm interested in hearing about individual experiences with rooftop solar. Do you actually get enough out of it to power everything, say, on a hot afternoon with the A/C running? On average how much power do you have to buy from NV Energy during the day?

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    3. 10:50 you can only get panels on the southwest portion of your roof, according to what the rules are from what i was told. so depending on how much space you have on your roof, it does a decent amount offsetting a good amount. for example, my house can get offset by solar power by up to 70% when i am at my top end use of electricity. However, during fall and winter months (when there is no A/C being used) my bill overall is about $60-70. During summer, it is about $120. Before, with NV energy, it used to be about $250-300. I have a two story house, and have two A/C units. so it makes a big difference to me during summer months

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  5. Individual solar is a boondoggle for probably 90% of homeowners. They sit in their unsealed, barely insulated homes, and wonder why their power bill is so high. They figure it must be because big bad NV Energy is ripping them off. Then, you get fearmongering salesmen warning about the coming rate hikes that are sure to bankrupt you unless you protect yourself by either paying a significant monthly sum to them or paying a huge amount to purchase the panels outright.

    Invest in efficiency. Seal your drafts. Improve your insulation. Reduce your consumption (or take advantage of Time of Use to shift your consumption to cheaper hours). You will see the break-even point on solar drift longer and longer away, and you'll realize that individual solar panels do not make sense. Not at the rates currently being charged, anyway.

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    1. You barely saved yourself there, with that last line. Your arguments are completely made up, and the only truth is that, at the current rates, everyone is being screwed by NV Energy.

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    2. My monthly power bills barely break $60 from September - May. This month (covering May 20 - June 20), it will be about $100. I might break $250 over the next two months, but it's doubtful. And this is for a 5 bedroom house. But, please, go ahead and tell me how I can save so much money by switching to solar at $100 - $200 a month.

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    3. Currently, and this is the salient point, you can't, they've rigged the system.

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    4. Buying solar from SolarCity/Sun Run will saves you money by selling you power at a cheaper rate than NV Energy. SolarCity charges me 8.9 cents per kwh, locked in for the next 20 years. NV Energy's current rate is 10.35 per kwh, with no lock. That price is certain to go up over the next 20 years, but mine will stay the same during that period.

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    5. Uh, you do know that NVE provides cheaper rates than that, right? My rate in non-summer is closer to 5.5 cents per kwh. Sure, peak is a pain, but at least for the first year, you are guaranteed not to pay more than you would have on the standard rate.

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    6. There was a study reported in the RJ, I forget by which agency but not PUC and not the solar lobby, that stated the solar industry saved something like $15 mil per year in indirect benefits to all ratepayers. I'd say that's an argument for telling the PUC to eat a penis.

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    7. Dipped in a fresh dog turd. But anonymously, over a fake Twitter account.

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    8. There's some value, difficult to monetize, for environmental impact, too. I believe in human-caused climate change (though not necessarily what most believers seem to think should be done about it), so I buy into the argument that carbon-based power fails to account for the costs of the carbon and that if it did, it wouldn't be as competitive with renewables. That would certainly have a bearing on whether or not I decided to go solar.

      I've gotta agree with 11:20, though, about efficiency. Almost zero effort goes into this. Good thermal insulation shouldn't be an upgrade for homes, it should be the bare minimum standard available. I've got a friend with a <5 year old house in Henderson that they keep at 70 degrees and their power bill is much less than mine, even though I've got about half the square footage.

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    9. I too have to agree with 11:20 re insulation and the like; if the homeowner's goal is to reduce the cost of paying for electricity - which is principally a function of consumption - one of the best places to start is with the home's insulation (which is typically cheap as hell when installed by track-home builders). Replace it with better, higher rated insulation. That, coupled with identifying and correcting construction leaks/gaps is a far better first step than, for example, leasing a solar panel system, of all things. Really.

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  6. @12:32, that 10.35 per kwh is the average rate. So obviously it incorporates both the high peak rate and the low winter rate. Mine is still lower.

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    1. I'd be veeerry interested in seeing the weights attached to each rate to determine $0.1035/kwh "average." Particularly since the point of TOU is to encourage you to avoid, as much as possible, using power during high-demand times. Do that, and you are rewarded with significant savings. I'd be willing to hazard, for example, that my annual cost per kwh is significantly below what you get with solar. Even at your pre-PUC ruling rates.

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