Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Holiday Party Post 2015

It's that time of year again where tradition dictates that firms have a holiday party to make everyone awkwardly uncomfortable in a social setting with their co-workers. So what is your firm doing this year in that regard? Fancy dinner, bowling party, Disneyland, layoffs? We already heard that Eglet had his party last weekend--was it at Hyde? Are there any photos? What is your idea for the best firm Christmas party?

22 comments:

  1. Steakhouse. I own a firm and we have about 40 employees. Am I wasting my money doing a firm party. We always have fun and have a party every 3 months anyways. However, if I am wasting 5-6k I will not have one going forward. Thoughts?

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    1. I have found, albeit with a smaller firm, 12 of us, that a holiday party improves morale, gets the spouses to meet the firm and become comfortable with all of us when somebody has to work late, and is a good time. Plus somebody's husband or wife invariably gets wasted and allows us to make fun of that person for at least a month. Totally worth it. I spend close to $5K so I'm guessing you leave the bar out of it.

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    2. At the two firms I previously worked, one held a pot lunch and the other went all out (weekend, dress up, at a casino, DJ, dance floor, dinner/dessert/late night appetizers). Both were appreciated, but a nice steakhouse dinner sounds perfect.

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    3. I rather have the money in my paycheck. I'm calling out sick.

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  2. Eglet party was fun. He knows how to put on a show.

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    1. It was at the Hyde Bellagio. What dignitaries did you recognize--judges, justices, elected officials. Any defense attorneys or mostly plaintiffs?

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    2. Being at Eglet's party is not an honor, believe me.

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    3. I heard the party started at 7pm and half the room was gone by 8pm.

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    4. I think it was a honor. They were enforcing the guest list this year. Mixed bag of plaintiff's attorneys, some defense attorneys, judges, employees, and clients. It was a great party.

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    5. You would. Enforcing the guest list, please. Eglet is an ass.

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    6. "Enforcing the guest list." Lame. I think it's more fun when anyone can show up, judges, hobos, lawyers, hookers, whatever. Like the CPK and Richard Harris parties.

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    7. The Eglet party was awesome. I attend a number of large social events throughout the year, including several holiday parties, and in my opinion this party is consistently the best of the bunch. I left around midnight and the party was still going strong. It was a mix of attorneys (both sides), judges, doctors, and a few elected officials (Shelley Berkley was one). To the haters: Don't be jealous, maybe one year you will be cool enough to make the invite list.

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    8. "Don't be jealous, maybe one year you will be cool enough to make the invite list."

      Not jealous. Does that make the party less fun, 8:38 AM?

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    9. 8:38, get a life and a clue.

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  3. I own a firm with 4 employees. I'm just taking everyone out to a nice dinner. Everybody gets along so it's not awkward. I don't see it as a waste of money and the employees seem to appreciate it.

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  4. Dinner at a steakhouse with all attorneys and staff. No spouses. Alcohol included.

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    1. Not to be preachy, but I've worked I the past for an employer who had no spouse dinner parties and they were a source of terrible stress and anger, but everyone was too intimidated to say anything. Lunch is one thing but dinner with alcohol really angers a lot of spouses, especially if it's a workplace where you're already spending more hours there than at home. I would respectfully urge you to reevaluate this policy. There may be great resentment already, but you're just not aware of it.

      Besides, no spouse just doesn't strike me as being the in the holiday spirit.

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    2. As a single person, no spouses is great. Actually, it's a lot less stress. A spouse-invited work party is like a wedding... do I go it alonee and be put at the dreaded singles table, or go with a random date just to have a date, but them I'm miserable all night because I have to keep them company and I don't get to hang out with my friends/family as much as I want to. Have a heart and think of the single people in your life.

      Plus, small talk with husbands and wives can be tedious. And I know one day I will get in the middle of a husband/wife dispute when I mention that so-and-so never stays at work late even though he's been coming home every night at midnight saying he's been working on a big case.

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    3. Back in the day, there was an annual event called Bosses Night when all the bosses were men so it was bosses and legal secretaries. It was the source of many stories and a few disasters.

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    4. And so Adam Laxalt was conceived.....

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    5. I think it is important to invite spouses. Who the employee married will be reflected in the employee's output over the long term. When you hire someone, you are hiring the other half too. You have to get to know the other half in a social setting, preferably with lots of quality booze on tap. I have been surprised at some pairings. The classic sad case is a nice young man who seems to be on the way up and then you meet the wife who moans about how it's been "about him all this time but soon it will be about me." Poof, there goes that kid's career. No attorney can make it with a spouse who does not support the mission. There are exceptions of course, such as the dual power couple with a couple of nannies. These are far and few between. If the spouse is trouble, the employee will be trouble.

      Merry Christmas!

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    6. Now I know why he left me right before taking that job with the big firm!

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