Thursday, May 21, 2015

Those Who Can

In light of yesterday's news that Boyd law professor Nancy Rapoport would be chairing a committee to review legal fees and expenses in the Caesars bankruptcy, someone questioned the propriety of having a law professor (and law students as the article suggests) reviewing the fees and expenses of practicing attorneys. It was not a question about Rapoport as much as it was a question about law professors and law students. (It should be noted that although it has been awhile, Rapoport's Linked In resume does include 5 years in a law firm. It's also worth noting that she is no longer the Gordon Silver Professor of Law and is now the Garman Turner Gordon Professor of Law at Boyd.)

You've heard that saying, "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach." What do you think? Is there any truth to it? Did any of your law school classmates become law professors? Would you like them reviewing your legal fees and expenses? Are there better options for a court to determine the reasonableness of fees and expenses?

25 comments:

  1. If you knew anything about Rapoport you would know that she is a bankruptcy expert with experience in these types of monster bankruptcies even after leaving the firm life, for example she worked on the Station Casinos reorganization. She knows her stuff and is a consummate professional.

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    1. Nancy, please rewrite your first sentence. A comma after your name and a period after 'life'. And don't forget to place a comma after 'example' in the sentence that follows.

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    2. ^^^^Nominated for Post of the Day!

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  2. Thank you Nancy.

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  3. Nancy drives a Dodge Stratus.

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    1. I've also heard she can do 100 push-ups in 20 minutes.

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  4. "...the Gordon Silver Professor of Law and is now the Garman Turner Gordon Professor of Law at Boyd"

    I assume you're joking. Gordon Silver is the name of a corporation that exists outside the individuals. So, unless Messrs. Gordon and Silver funded that endowment personally, the title of the chair should remain.

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    1. Never mind. Just looked. You're not joking.

      Gordon Silver should sue, if it's around long enough to do anything about it.

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    2. I don't know how these sponsored professorships work, but my guess is that the firm agrees to an ongoing contribution to the law school. So when Gordon Silver went under, Garman Turner Gordon probably agreed to take over the obligation.

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    3. Why would Turner be a named partner? Does she have a huge book? And why did Gordon agree to put his name last? Does Garman have a bigger book than Gordon?

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  5. In Nevada those that can't do run for office. I would say judge but look at how many of those lunatics in Carson City have JD's. Hutchison and Crockett (on the bench) are the only ones I'm aware of that ever had a successful practices.

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    1. Judge Earl, Williams, Dorsey, Scotti, Gonzalez were all excellent lawyers.

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    2. kinda sad how short this list is

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    3. Better add Judge Gordon who was very successful in private practice. Cadish as well in addition to a number of successful prosecutors (Herndon, Silver) and crim. defense (Tao, Boulware).

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    4. I think some of those names might have been doing okay but I would classify successful as taking a pay cut to hold a public office.

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    5. Judges who have definitely taken a pay cut from their private practice days:
      Gordon
      Gonzalez
      Cadish
      Crockett
      Ferenbach

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    6. Hutchinson is still able to practice as Lt. Governor but how many other non judges in politics took a pay cut?

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    7. Gonzalez? you're kidding, right?

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  6. I don't do bankruptcy, so please excuse me in advance for my ignorance, but are the legal fees already that out of control in the Caesar's matter that a committee needs to be set up? I represent a client with a claim in that case that, while large, is relatively simple. We gave it to a local firm who does not appear to be milking it, but I was astounded at the number of solicitations I received from outside firms to handle our client's claim. They were mostly out-of-towners.

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    1. Solicitations to handle the claim? If true, that is a blatant ethics violation and should be reported immediately.

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  7. Whilst in law school, I was fairly impressed with my professors--especially those who had gotten published and been on tv shows and written parts of the code. Now with a little perspective, I'm less impressed. It's not that they couldn't hack it in the real world necessarily, but they don't have real world experience and it's hard for them to teach that.

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  8. Wasn't Rapoport on the fee committee for the Enron case? She seems to have been an expert witness on a LOT of bankruptcy matters (http://bit.ly/1cQYTx8)

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    1. Yeah. Fee examination is kind of her thing,

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  9. MIDNIGHT TRAIN LAWYER SAYS: Guardianship Commissioner Jon Norheim just got fired. The Honorable Diane Cynthia Steele of Family Court will now hear all guardianship matters. CHOOOO CHOOOO!

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