Monday, February 25, 2013

Movers & Shakers

So, now that we're nearly two months into the year--how is the job market looking? Did the January interview cycle result in a lot of musical chairs or is everyone still hunkered down? Is anyone hearing any rumors of mergers or major laterals? Any sinking ships to avoid?

10 comments:

  1. Somewhat on topic somewhat not. I was just wondering if the Frodo from the thread a little while back or another solo (most likely) on here who either has worked out of their homes/home office or knows someone who it has worked for in the past and how that has worked logistically speaking. Do you have a meeting/conference room that you go to to meet with clients? Do you have a virtual office set up somewhere to receive documents? I know there are many different types of practices where you could do most of the work from a remote/non-office location but the few times you would have to meet with clients I am just unsure how to go about doing so. Thanks.

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  2. It's been quiet at our local office of a national firm. In the first two months, only one lateral observed--out of our firm. No new hires. Not sure the market is any better now than last year.

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  3. @12:57- Not Frodo here but I am a former Solo (now small firm)who tried the whole "I'll just work from home" routine for about a year. It really is a question of what kind of law you practice. Which courts (if any) will you be in and how often? Some law is not very client contact driven while some is. For example, many criminal defense clients cannot come to you. If you are just reviewing documents for some other firm no issue. Only you can decide how much of the "lawyer like trappings" you will need for your practice.

    I did a mix of crim/small claims/PI when I worked from home and quickly discovered I got far less done from home due to distractions I never thought would happen. For example being home alot means all your family and friends think they can call/drop by whenever. After all, it can't be that important if you work from home, right? Also there are any number of better things to do at home than work like sleep, eat or do the dishes and tripple the trouble if you have kids or a stay at home significant other. I also found that the cost of parking near the RJC was a bit steep when I had to come to court. I know several people who do in fact work from home with a fairly limited practice, but all of them know someone willing to let them borrow conference room time or just run by and use the printer between hearings. If I was starting out again I would either go flexible virtual or find a place downtown I could rent an office. Remember the commercial real estate market is very soft so you don't have to settle. Good small firm offices can be had for a dollar a foot if you work at it.

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  4. I work from home (predominantly criminal and PI)...I have a UPS box that I use as my mailing address and my phone and fax at home. Most of my criminal clients are referrals, so I will usually meet them at a convenient Starbucks. Same with my PI clients once I get to know them. If I need something more formal, I use a conference room at a local law firm. It works well for me--but if I were more high volume I could see needing an office. For now it's good though.

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  5. Frodo here:

    Sorry -- I had to work yesterday. I never worked from home -- wouldn't be able to. I remember trying to study for the bar in my apartment, and I would do ANYTHING other than study -- clean, cook, eat, catch up on Maury -- it was awful.

    My partner originally started working from home, with a virtual office in summerlin. The company provided a store front, took her mail and answered her phone. They provided a conference and office space if needed, gave her a spot to hang her business license, and accepted packages and service.

    It was doable -- especially with email, efax, efiling, skype and facetime. The one (huge) drawback was that she tried to run her office with just a flat bed scanner -- and it was tedious. If you are going to do a home office, splurge and get a nice all in one machine--with double sided print and scan functions.

    According to her, there is a huge learning curve for working at home. Compartmentalizing your time and space is an art and discipline that had to be learned. It took her six weeks to understand it. It is not for everybody, and it is not easy, but doable and cheap.

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  6. I worked from home in a previous profession. I hated it and will never do it again. For me, the physical separation of work and home is too important. There is something (at least for me) to be said about leaving the space of work and going home to your sanctuary. When you turn your sanctuary into your workspace, you have no place to escape to. When I am at work, I want to work. When I am home, I do not want to even think about work.

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