Thursday, April 26, 2012

Barry Levinson Believes that a Judge is There to be Your Guide

The RJ has finally picked up on the Markell smack-down of Barry Levinson and his former associate, Jeremy Mondejar, that was discussed thoroughly in our post on the subject. Normally I wouldn't want to beat this one to death, but the RJ was kind enough to get comments from Levinson! And oh boy are they fun! (Maybe one day when this blog is a respectable news outlet we'll reach out to lawyers for comments).

I hope Mondejar has strapped on his scape-goat pants today, because Levinson is throwing the blame his way.  Levinson says that he let go of Mondejar the day of the hearing, October 12, 2011, because Mondejar "really embarrassed me."  Levinson apparently fired Mondejar even though he believes Markell was "a little harsh on Jeremy, and maybe on me." Mondejar, for his part, declined to comment on the situation, either trying to show some class and move on, or because he didn't know that Levinson was throwing him under the bus.

The best part of the article comes when Levinson comments on whether a judge should sanction attorneys for attorneys who don't live up to the judge's standards.  Levinson believes "It's his job to help guide us; if we're having problems, he should guide us." Apparently legal courts should be more like American Idol than Judge Judy.

And I think he is right. Why should any of us lawyers have to learn the law? All these rules and stuff, they just give me headaches! I'd rather just show up at a hearing and hope that the judge tells me what to do. That's what I'm getting paid $300/hour to do, right?



-JD

12 comments:

  1. http://www.attorneybarrylevinson.com/page.php?id=9

    Levinson: "Many people do not know that I represented the infamous John Wayne Bobbitt, concerning his domestic violence cases.
    Furthermore, many people do not know that I had got him acquitted every time by 2 different judges. How, may you ask?
    The Truth is that I am a great attorney."

    ReplyDelete
  2. Give Barry a break, he tries to be a good attorney, he may not show up in Court, he may not be really good on accounting or communicating with his Clients, but he tries...

    ReplyDelete
  3. I hope you are joking at 10:26! I will give him his due process though.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What annoys me is that every attorney (even, in the case of Levinson, objectively bad ones) claim to be great attorneys. The entire attorney population is obsessed with ratings and is certain that they are in the top percentage of all practitioners. Perhaps it's just a guise to get clients, but it drives me nuts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A friend of mine got a business card from a solo practitioner which listed his title as "Founding Partner." Of, you know, his firm. Which consisted of him. And nobody else.

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sorry to delete your post. While I didn’t necessarily disagree with the point (I think) you were making, I think everyone will sleep better tonight this way..

    ReplyDelete
  7. That would be an awesome thing to put on your business card as a joke. If it was serious, not so awesome.

    ReplyDelete
  8. @3:36,
    If the State Bar had stones and unlimited resources, that could be the basis for a complaint for violating NRPC 7.5(d). A ten second google search turned up opinions in Ohio and Minnesota addressing the practice. If I hadn't gotten bored, I probably would have found more that said you can only include "and Associates" in your name if, you know, you actually have some, and you can only call yourself a partner if you have a partner.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I know a friend of mine looked into it and was told that he could start the "Bob Jones Law Group" as long as he had at least one other person involved -- even a part-time receptionist.

    ReplyDelete
  10. @4:31,

    Yeah, until Bob Jones suddenly dies and the clients can't get their cases transferred because they assumed "Group" meant more than one practicing attorney.

    ReplyDelete
  11. There's a certain plaintiff PI attorney in town who advertises quite a bit and talks about he and his associates representing you, his firm's name likewise says "& Assoc."
    Yet, he refers files that go into litigation to a feeder firm because he doesn't have any associates. In fact, he doesn't keep associates because sooner or later he becomes threatened by them and fires them...or they get tired of him swinging his golf club when mad....

    ReplyDelete